Cold War Probiotic Discovery Now a Weapon in American Cold & Flu War

Soviet Cold-War era Chief Health Minister and scientist, General Vsevolod Ogarkov, had no idea the fruits of his bio-warfare research program would be used by 21st century American doctors and patients for immune system support during the winter cold and flu season. Dr. Ogarkov’s team were the first researchers to successfully modify probiotics, also known as “friendly” bacteria, as immune system supplements.

The probiotic-derived supplement Del-Immune V® is the culmination of Russian and U.S research that began 30 years ago with Dr. Ogarkov’s discoveries. Originally developed in the bio-warfare labs of the former Soviet Union, the immune-support supplement was first developed to protect Soviet soldiers and citizens from bio-warfare agents. Modern research confirms Dr. Ogarkov’s findings that the grandchild of his original research, Del-Immune V, triggers an immediate immune response to help protect users not only from bio-toxins, but seasonal illness and other viruses and infections as well.

Scientifically known as Lactobacillus bacteria, probiotics are a traditional part of the Eastern-European food culture. Probiotics support the body in dozens of functions, including healing and maintenance of the impaired immune system and digestive tract.

Today, Del-Immune V is the only probiotic-derived products in the U.S. made from the original Russian formula and offers a natural way to build up your immune system during the cold and flu season.

“Even though probiotics were first discovered in the early 20th century, we discover new uses for them every day,” said Dr. Liubov Shynkarenko, Ph.D. and Vice-President of Pure Research Products, distributor of Del-Immune V.

Early in her career, Shynkarenko, a Russian-trained microbiologist, helped develop the product for the USSR and discovered that Del-Immune V could be helpful in supporting the immune system during cancer treatment and other serious health challenges such as virus infections.

“What was developed in the old Soviet Union during the Cold War is now being used to keep people healthy all over the world,” said Dr. Shynkaranko.

“I have observed that patients who support their immune system with Del-Immune V significantly reduce the number of times they get sick over the winter season and also show decreased duration of colds and flu,” said Elin Ritchie M.D., who practices integrative medicine in Taos, N.M.

About Del-Immune
Del-Immune V®, manufactured by Lyoferm Inc (Indiana) and distributed by Boulder-based Pure Research Products LLC (PRP), is a probiotic-derived nutritional supplement that provides immediate immune system support. Del-Immune represents the culmination of 30 years of research originated by Cold War-era Soviet Bloc scientists and Russian military bio-warfare troop protection programs. PRP obtained exclusive rights to manufacture, distribute and market the unique Lactobacillus rhamnosus (DV strain) from its Russian partners in 2002. Del-Immune V is used by thousands and recommended by doctors around the world. For more information on how Del-Immune V works, click here.

Five Easy Ways to Fight Seasonal Fatigue

If it seems like it’s just harder to roll out of bed every morning when the temperature drops and sunrise comes later, you’re not imagining things – and you’re not alone. Whether they have chronic fatigue, seasonal affective disorder (SAD) or an old-fashioned case of the seasonal blues, many people experience fatigue when seasons change and the weather cools.

Fatigue is common, with up to 50 percent of adults reporting feeling chronically tired according to several recent surveys. In fact, at least 20 percent of doctor visits are made by people looking for relief from fatigue, one study reports. The season’s effect on fatigue and depression is well-known, with the American Academy of Family Physicians reporting six out of every 100 Americans suffer from winter depression or SAD.

“Shorter days, darker skies, colder weather, poor sleep habits, and the stresses that come with the busy holidays and months at the end of the year can leave many people feeling fatigued and depressed at this time of year,” says Dr. Elin Ritchie, a specialist in family alternative medicine.

Even if your case of the seasonal blues is mild, it still makes sense to take steps to help yourself feel better – prolonged fatigue and depression can affect your overall health. Here are some tips for fighting fatigue:

  1. Get as much (safe) sun exposure as possible. Open drapes and blinds as soon as you get up to allow sunlight into your home. If you can, take a morning walk. Get as much time outdoors as your schedule and the weather permit. Sunlight stimulates the production of vitamin D in your body and also benefits your mental health. Remember, though, to use sunscreen, as the sun’s ultraviolet rays can still damage your skin, even in winter.
  2. Stick to a reliable sleep schedule as much as possible. Go to bed and rise at the same time every day. And make sure your bedroom is conducive to sleep – declutter, choose comfortable and comforting linens, and turn off the TV.
  3. Choose foods that are high in protein. Fruits and vegetables provide many healthful benefits and definitely belong in your diet. But for long-lasting energy, you’ll get more benefit from lean protein (like chicken and fish) and complex carbohydrates such as whole-grain bread or beans. Avoid too much sugar, no matter how tempting those holiday treats appear – sugar’s energy rush is usually followed by an energy drop that can leave you feeling more fatigued.
  4. Find ways to relax. The cooler seasons can be a very stressful time and stress can keep you awake at night. To combat natural levels of stress, find activities that relax you, whether it’s container gardening indoors, meditation or aromatherapy. Relieving stress can help improve sleep patterns.
  5. It’s also important that you support your immune system, especially during cold and flu season. Fatigue can lead to illness. “New studies show that sleep deprivation has detrimental effects on the immune system,” says Ritchie. “Researchers believe that sleep should be considered a vital part of immune function, as it is clear that sleep and immunity are directly related.”

Deficiency in anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 is a key factor in the cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, according to an article recently published in the Journal of Clinical and Vaccine Immunology. Consider a nutritional supplement, like Del-Immune V, that increases the activity of interleukins in the body. Supporting your immune system may help lessen the symptoms of fatigue. Patients who take a regular dose of Del-Immune V to support their immune systems report a significant increase in energy levels.

“This time of year can be exhausting for many reasons,” Ritchie notes. “But a few simple lifestyle changes, healthful diet and immune system support can help you feel more energized throughout the season.”

To learn more about Del-Immune V, click here.

Article from ARA Content

Probiotics and Liver Health

By maintaining a constant temperature, the human gut provides an appealing habitat for many bacteria to grow. While the human body hosts trillions of bacteria known as normal intestinal flora, about 85 percent of these bacteria are considered harmless, some even beneficial. Our normal flora produces essential nutrients and generates by-products that help reduce the risk of developing certain cancers, digestive disorders, metabolic syndromes as well as liver and heart disease.

Aging and alterations in the intestine’s environment caused by antibiotic use disrupt the digestive system’s balance. In the case of antibiotics, the medicine kills everything living in the gut, including harmful bacteria as well as healthy intestinal flora. Killing off healthy flora allows harmful intestinal bacteria to gain proportional dominance. This relative imbalance of microbes in the gut sets the stage for a wide range of unhealthy conditions.

A 2003 study by researchers at Johns Hopkins University looked at the connection between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and intestinal bacteria over-growth. Researchers concluded that intestinal bacteria play a significant role in hepatic insulin resistance and NAFLD.

Researchers at the Imperial College of London recently surmised that altering the intestine’s microbial environment could be effective in addressing insulin resistance.  Researchers found that genetics is responsible for the presence of a specific type of microbe in mice intestines. This microbial excess predisposed mice to insulin resistance and NAFLD.

Researchers are hopeful that their observations of a mouse’s intestinal environment will translate into improving human health. When the mice in this study were fed a high fat diet, the microbes transformed choline, the nutrient essential for metabolizing fat, into methylamines. Scientists believe methylamines, which can only be produced by the microbes in the intestines, lead to insulin resistance. In addition, because choline is needed to transport fat out of the liver, altering choline metabolism leads to fat accumulation, and in turn, NAFLD. By changing the balance of intestinal microbes, it will be possible to reduce someone’s chances of becoming insulin resistant, developing NAFLD or suffering from associated problems.

Insulin is a hormone released by the pancreas in response to elevated blood sugar levels. By pushing glucose out of the bloodstream and into the body’s cells where it is converted into energy, insulin keeps blood glucose levels in check. Cells that are insulin resistant lead to decreased energy production, resulting in fatigue. High amounts of insulin in the blood increase triglycerides, which deposit fatty acids in the liver. In prolonged cases of insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus develops. Being overweight, leading a sedentary lifestyle, eating a diet rich in sugar and fat and a preponderance of intestinal microbes all promote insulin resistance.

Probiotics utilize beneficial bacteria to support the health of the gastrointestinal system by suppressing the growth of, or destroying undesirable bacteria. The regular use of probiotics can re-colonize the gastrointestinal tract with enough normal flora to prevent potentially damaging microbes from gaining dominance. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins 2003 study evaluating probiotic use to improve NAFLD suggested the inclusion of probiotics in a plan to prevent additional accumulation of fat in the liver.

Living with microbes in the gut is a normal occurrence in the human gastrointestinal system. However, the recent determination that an intestinal microbial imbalance encourages insulin resistance and NAFLD demonstrates that people concerned with these conditions should aim to preserve or build up healthy intestinal flora. Used around the world for gastrointestinal health, the regular use of probiotics is the most acknowledged way to support a favorable balance of intestinal microbes.

Feed the Immune System During Cold and Flu Season

Our immune systems are smart. When exposed to new viruses, our immune system learns to recognize and react to many different strains of the invaders. The system also remembers bugs it has seen before. But, we’re in a mobile society. Each year world travel brings new strains of germs and viruses home, forcing the immune system to deal with new invaders it has never seen.

This is why the Center for Disease Control makes yearly changes to the flu vaccine, hoping to predict which bugs will arrive in the U.S. on a seasonal basis.

A flu vaccine may help during cold and flu season, but there’s no guarantee for full protection. Extra efforts are needed to avoid seasonal germs, including a healthy diet, exercise and nutritional supplements. Here are some suggestions for building up immune system support against seasonal infections and avoid the seasonal flu:

Diet can make a difference. Prevention Magazine recently published a list of immunity-boosting foods, including lean beef (in moderation) for its zinc content, orange vegetables like sweet potatoes and carrots for vitamins A and D, mushrooms such as shitakes which may help white blood cells act more aggressively against foreign invaders and a daily cup of black or green tea to provide powerful antioxidant activity.

According to ABC News, turmeric, a rich and flavorful spice, has been used for centuries as part of Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicines in addition to being used for cooking. Turmeric is found in every yellow curry, and its golden color is the result of curcumin, a polyphenol with strong cold and flu-fighting properties. Although the mechanism is unclear, a study published in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications found that curcumin prevents some immune cells from responding to stimulantsand has some anti-inflammatory effects. Other studies have also shown the immune-boosting properties of curcumin in turmeric, however these results have not been confirmed in humans.

Turmeric is found naturally as the rhizome part of the turmeric plant and looks very similar to ginger. The powdered spice is made by boiling, drying and grinding the root. The power has antiseptic qualities when applied to to cuts, burns and bruises. The spice is available as an encapsulated supplement at health food stores.

In addition to a healthy diet, Del-Immune V® may provide significant support to avoid seasonal bugs. The muramyl peptides in Del-Immune V® act as switches in the immune system and are responsible for dramatically elevating immune activity in our bodies. This increased activity is critical for fighting many of the germs that infect our bodies—especially seasonal infections caused by immune depression. The addition of Del-Immune V® to a daily immune-support regimen can help users achieve year-round health.

To learn more about how to improve immune system readiness with Del-Immune V®, click here.